Photos: U.S. propaganda art, posters of World War IIlove car

Photos: U.S. propaganda art, posters of World War IIlove car http://www.chron.com/news/nation-world/article/Photos-U-S-propaganda-art-posters-of-World-War-12413201.php

By John Boyd

Updated 11:47 am, Thursday, December 7, 2017
Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Sailors were reminded that careless words shouldn't be spoken to their female dates, who could be spies.

Sailors were reminded that careless words shouldn't be spoken to their female dates, who could be spies.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Soldiers were asked to uphold the "old American custom" of daily showers in this cheeky propaganda poster.

Soldiers were asked to uphold the "old American custom" of daily showers in this cheeky propaganda poster.

Photo: Swim Ink 2 Llc/Corbis Via Getty Images

The U.S. Navy warned sailors against laziness, which weakened the navy and aided its enemies.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

The U.S. Navy warned sailors against laziness, which weakened the navy and aided its enemies.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They

... more
Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Wartime propaganda poster from U.S. Dept of Labor stating that "America will be as strong as her women."

Wartime propaganda poster from U.S. Dept of Labor stating that "America will be as strong as her women."

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

American propaganda poster showing a serviceman who is trying to impress his girl by passing on information that may seem innocent, but Hitler's newspaper reminds the viewer that in war any news might prove fatal if it falls into the hands of the enemy.

less

American propaganda poster showing a serviceman who is trying to impress his girl by passing on information that may seem innocent, but Hitler's newspaper reminds the viewer that in war any news might prove

... more
Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

Farmers back home were encouraged to "Produce for Victory" to keep troops and citizens healthy and strong.

Farmers back home were encouraged to "Produce for Victory" to keep troops and citizens healthy and strong.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Poster of American sailor with clenched fist vowing to punish Japan for the attack on the American fleet in Pearl Harbor, 1941.

Poster of American sailor with clenched fist vowing to punish Japan for the attack on the American fleet in Pearl Harbor, 1941.

Photo: Photo 12/UIG Via Getty Images

Government issued wartime poster encouraging Americans not to waste food, 1943.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

Government issued wartime poster encouraging Americans not to waste food, 1943.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented

... more
Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

An anti-Nazi poster suggests that carelessness brings America one step closer to German occupation.

An anti-Nazi poster suggests that carelessness brings America one step closer to German occupation.

Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG Via Getty Images

A woman wearing a US helmet and firing a toy gun leads the New Year celebrations with the slogan 'Happy New Year 1945', on Jan. 1, 1945. The rest of the caption reads 'How will you die on the battlefield? Will you be maimed or blinded? The war marches on!' A German poster designed to demoralize Allied troops during World War II.

less

A woman wearing a US helmet and firing a toy gun leads the New Year celebrations with the slogan 'Happy New Year 1945', on Jan. 1, 1945. The rest of the caption reads 'How will you die on the battlefield? Will

... more
Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

A poster reads "Stamp 'em Out!", and features the faces of Mussolini, Hitler, and Tojo. It advertises the sale of U.S. bonds and stamps.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

A poster reads "Stamp 'em Out!", and features the faces of Mussolini, Hitler, and Tojo. It advertises the sale of U.S. bonds and stamps.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now

... more
Photo: Library Of Congress/Corbis/VCG Via Getty Images

A US poster from World War II encouraging people to join a carpool, 1942. The slogan reads 'When you ride alone you ride with Hitler! Join a car-sharing club today!'

A US poster from World War II encouraging people to join a carpool, 1942. The slogan reads 'When you ride alone you ride with Hitler! Join a car-sharing club today!'

Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

Poster of an illustrated worker being attacked by bugs that represent causes of absenteeism, 1942.

Poster of an illustrated worker being attacked by bugs that represent causes of absenteeism, 1942.

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Government issued wartime educational poster encouraging Americans not to overcook food, causing it to lose precious vitamins.

Government issued wartime educational poster encouraging Americans not to overcook food, causing it to lose precious vitamins.

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Government issued wartime poster encouraging Americans to make use of leftovers as a way to extend food supplies.

Government issued wartime poster encouraging Americans to make use of leftovers as a way to extend food supplies.

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

A government issued wartime poster for the school lunch program in 1941.= reminds that healthy bodies are healthy for the country.

A government issued wartime poster for the school lunch program in 1941.= reminds that healthy bodies are healthy for the country.

Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

A World War II color poster encouraging American workers to work hard. The poster shows caricatures of enemy leaders peeking from behind a pole, with a caption that reads: "They're watching us. . .PLENTY! The stuff "on order" doesn't count. . .but real production hurts them! Put ALL your power in the job!"

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

A World War II color poster encouraging American workers to work hard. The poster shows caricatures of enemy leaders peeking from behind a pole, with a caption that reads: "They're watching us. . .PLENTY! The

... more
Photo: Historical/Corbis Via Getty Images

Using a wide-eyed fish's encounter with a hook as a warning, this World War II poster advises Americans to "Keep your mouth shut" - and not divulge war secrets.

Using a wide-eyed fish's encounter with a hook as a warning, this World War II poster advises Americans to "Keep your mouth shut" - and not divulge war secrets.

Photo: Historical/Corbis Via Getty Images

American propaganda poster reading "Death Trap For The Jap" are aimed at Japan's then occupation of Alaskan islands, in the Aleutian Islands Campaign, 1943.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

American propaganda poster reading "Death Trap For The Jap" are aimed at Japan's then occupation of Alaskan islands, in the Aleutian Islands Campaign, 1943.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often

... more
Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG Via Getty Images

Women who joined the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps were portrayed as heroic figures in countless World War II propaganda posters.

Women who joined the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps were portrayed as heroic figures in countless World War II propaganda posters.

Photo: Swim Ink 2 Llc/Corbis Via Getty Images

WWII Poster showing helmeted soldier applying insect repellent to prevent insect born disease and infection.

WWII Poster showing helmeted soldier applying insect repellent to prevent insect born disease and infection.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

The "Tokio Kid" was a frequently used character used in U.S. propaganda campaigns against its enemy Japan during World War II. The character generally was used to thank Americans for their careless attitudes which the propaganda suggested aided America's enemies.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

The "Tokio Kid" was a frequently used character used in U.S. propaganda campaigns against its enemy Japan during World War II. The character generally was used to thank Americans for their careless attitudes

... more
Photo: Getty Images

US Goverment poster showing bare chested soldier being bit by malarial mosquito with text reading "Keep your shirt on soldier, exposed skin after dark is meat for malaria mosquito, fight the peril behind the lines."

less

US Goverment poster showing bare chested soldier being bit by malarial mosquito with text reading "Keep your shirt on soldier, exposed skin after dark is meat for malaria mosquito, fight the peril behind the

... more
Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

A bare-chested airman exercises in the foreground to keep fit for the fight.

A bare-chested airman exercises in the foreground to keep fit for the fight.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

A propaganda poster suggests that the recent sinking of a U.S. ship was caused by someone who leaked military secrets.

A propaganda poster suggests that the recent sinking of a U.S. ship was caused by someone who leaked military secrets.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

A sinister looking soldier wearing a German Stahlhelm M16 steel helmet surreptitiously peers over a wall at the viewer. Under the Nazi regime, the unique German Stahlhelm M16 steel helmet became an icon of military prowess and national pride, while for the Allies it became a symbol of menacing evil.

less

A sinister looking soldier wearing a German Stahlhelm M16 steel helmet surreptitiously peers over a wall at the viewer. Under the Nazi regime, the unique German Stahlhelm M16 steel helmet became an icon of

... more
Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

The hat literally flies off the head of a German soldier, succefully "surprised" because silence was kept.

The hat literally flies off the head of a German soldier, succefully "surprised" because silence was kept.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

This propaganda poster for the Navy reminds that loose lips do indeed sink ships.

This propaganda poster for the Navy reminds that loose lips do indeed sink ships.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Posters like thee encouraged plane factories to keep building so pilots overseas could "keep 'em firing."

Posters like thee encouraged plane factories to keep building so pilots overseas could "keep 'em firing."

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Woman Ordnance Workers had the ultimate "WOW" factor in this World War II propaganda poster.

Woman Ordnance Workers had the ultimate "WOW" factor in this World War II propaganda poster.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

A propaganda poster shows a soldier being left behind because he contracted a venereal disease, costing him the opportunity to serve his country.

A propaganda poster shows a soldier being left behind because he contracted a venereal disease, costing him the opportunity to serve his country.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Americans were reminded to prevent forest fires and the waste of forest resources that could be used in the war effort.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

Americans were reminded to prevent forest fires and the waste of forest resources that could be used in the war effort.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or

... more
Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Productivity at work back home was encouraged to keep the U.S. economy strong.

Productivity at work back home was encouraged to keep the U.S. economy strong.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

Color advertisement printed by the United States Government during World War II to encourage people to can food preserves, "Can All You Can, It's a Real War Job!" It shows a can with the slogan across it, and fruits and vegetables in the background.

less

Color advertisement printed by the United States Government during World War II to encourage people to can food preserves, "Can All You Can, It's a Real War Job!" It shows a can with the slogan across it, and

... more
Photo: Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Drawing on Japanese samurai traditions, American propagandists portrayed the Japanese as blindly fanatic and ruthless, with a history of desiring overseas conquests. Japanese propaganda often called for the Japanese people to become "one hundred million hearts beating as one" which Allied propagandists used to portray the Japanese as a mindless, unified mass. Atrocities were ascribed to the Japanese people as a whole.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

Drawing on Japanese samurai traditions, American propagandists portrayed the Japanese as blindly fanatic and ruthless, with a history of desiring overseas conquests. Japanese propaganda often called for the

... more
Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG Via Getty Images

A propaganda post asks American women "Are you a girl with a star-spangled heart? Join the WAC now! Thousands of Army jobs need filling! Women's Army Corps for the United States Army recruitment poster."

A propaganda post asks American women "Are you a girl with a star-spangled heart? Join the WAC now! Thousands of Army jobs need filling! Women's Army Corps for the United States Army recruitment poster."

Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG Via Getty Images

Poster encouraging participation in civil defense efforts, showing family prepared for work. Service on the home front There's a job for every Pennsylvanian in these civilian defense efforts.

Poster encouraging participation in civil defense efforts, showing family prepared for work. Service on the home front There's a job for every Pennsylvanian in these civilian defense efforts.

Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG Via Getty Images

A poster distributed to employees of the Douglas Aircraft Company reminds them not to be careless with the mixing of rivets used to hold aircraft together.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

A poster distributed to employees of the Douglas Aircraft Company reminds them not to be careless with the mixing of rivets used to hold aircraft together.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often

... more
Photo: Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Americans were encouraged to "Give 'Em Both Barrels" – the firearm on the battlefront and the riveting gun in factories back home.

Americans were encouraged to "Give 'Em Both Barrels" – the firearm on the battlefront and the riveting gun in factories back home.

Photo: Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

American propaganda poster showing a soldier in a cemetery carrying crosses over his shoulder and a shovel in one hand. The message suggests that by buying war bonds, Americans prevent needless deaths of troops overseas.

less

American propaganda poster showing a soldier in a cemetery carrying crosses over his shoulder and a shovel in one hand. The message suggests that by buying war bonds, Americans prevent needless deaths of troops

... more
Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

American propaganda poster showing an army cap and a hand sinking in water. This is one of a large group of posters, which warned against careless discussion of the whereabouts of troops or ships, many of which were being sunk off the United States coast.

less

American propaganda poster showing an army cap and a hand sinking in water. This is one of a large group of posters, which warned against careless discussion of the whereabouts of troops or ships, many of which

... more
Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

A variety of propaganda campaigns during World War II asked Americans to donate their personal items to the war effort, including binoculars.

A variety of propaganda campaigns during World War II asked Americans to donate their personal items to the war effort, including binoculars.

Photo: Getty Images

This American propaganda poster showing a woman standing with hoe and basket of vegetables, suggesting that by growing their own food, Americans could save other food supplies for troops overseas..

This American propaganda poster showing a woman standing with hoe and basket of vegetables, suggesting that by growing their own food, Americans could save other food supplies for troops overseas..

Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

After the war in Europe slowed, Americans were encourage to "Finish the Job" by buying war bonds to support the fight in the Pacific and Asia.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

After the war in Europe slowed, Americans were encourage to "Finish the Job" by buying war bonds to support the fight in the Pacific and Asia.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images

... more
Photo: Photo 12/UIG Via Getty Images

Americans weren't just asked to buy American products to boost the economy and help support the war effort, but to do the same for its allies.

Americans weren't just asked to buy American products to boost the economy and help support the war effort, but to do the same for its allies.

Photo: Photo 12/UIG Via Getty Images

Poster issued by the US Treasury promoting US Savings Bonds during the World War II, with the caption 'Back your future with US Savings Bonds', circa 1941 to 1945.

Poster issued by the US Treasury promoting US Savings Bonds during the World War II, with the caption 'Back your future with US Savings Bonds', circa 1941 to 1945.

Photo: Fotosearch/Getty Images

Women were encouraged to donate their time, energy and labor skills to the workforce back home.

Women were encouraged to donate their time, energy and labor skills to the workforce back home.

Photo: Photo 12/UIG Via Getty Images

A propaganda poster asks Americans not to waste coal so it can be used to build bombs for the war.

A propaganda poster asks Americans not to waste coal so it can be used to build bombs for the war.

Photo: The National Archives/SSPL Via Getty Images

The money raised from war bonds was used for a variety of purposes, including first aid for soldiers.

The money raised from war bonds was used for a variety of purposes, including first aid for soldiers.

Photo: Photo 12/UIG Via Getty Images

Poster issued by the US Office of War Information during World War II, with the caption 'Food is a weapon, don't waste it!'. The poster, promoting maintenance of a healthy lifestyle during World War II, was issued in 1943. (Photo by Fotosearch/Getty Images)

less

Poster issued by the US Office of War Information during World War II, with the caption 'Food is a weapon, don't waste it!'. The poster, promoting maintenance of a healthy lifestyle during World War II, was

... more
Photo: Fotosearch/Getty Images

An Anti-German poster shows Nazis burning books and quoting Franklin D. Roosevelt, 'Books cannot be killed by fire.'

An Anti-German poster shows Nazis burning books and quoting Franklin D. Roosevelt, 'Books cannot be killed by fire.'

Photo: UniversalImagesGroup/Getty Images

A US poster from World War II features a grinning Japanese soldier begging Texaco workers to 'Go ahead please - take day off!', circa 1942.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

A US poster from World War II features a grinning Japanese soldier begging Texaco workers to 'Go ahead please - take day off!', circa 1942.

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now

... more
Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

A US World War II poster showing a two-headed German/Japanese monster tearing the Statue of Liberty apart, while in the foreground a hand holds a wrench with the word 'Production' on the handle, 1943. Beneath are the words 'Stop this monster that stops at nothing... Produce to the limit! This is YOUR war!'

Editor's Note: Propaganda art of the 1940s often depicted images now considered racist or otherwise offensive. They are presented here unedited for educational and historical purposes to demonstrate how these types of images were used to draw up fervor against and hatred for foreign enemies during World War II.

less

A US World War II poster showing a two-headed German/Japanese monster tearing the Statue of Liberty apart, while in the foreground a hand holds a wrench with the word 'Production' on the handle, 1943. Beneath

... more
Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

A poster by Keyn Dirksen showing a sailing ship with its sails composed of the flags of Europe and entitled 'All Our Colours To The Mast'.

A poster by Keyn Dirksen showing a sailing ship with its sails composed of the flags of Europe and entitled 'All Our Colours To The Mast'.

Photo: MPI/Getty Images

A US poster from World War II depicting a soldier manning a machine gun above the words 'Let's give him enough and on time', 1942. Poster by Norman Rockwell.

A US poster from World War II depicting a soldier manning a machine gun above the words 'Let's give him enough and on time', 1942. Poster by Norman Rockwell.

Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images

Brendan Lawrence, a porter at Wallis and Wallis Auctioneers, holds one of a rare collection of 150 Second World War propaganda posters which have been auctioned in the sale rooms in Lewes, East Sussex.

Brendan Lawrence, a porter at Wallis and Wallis Auctioneers, holds one of a rare collection of 150 Second World War propaganda posters which have been auctioned in the sale rooms in Lewes, East Sussex.

Photo: Gareth Fuller - PA Images/PA Images Via Getty Images

Sailors were reminded that careless words shouldn't be spoken to their female dates, who could be spies.

Sailors were reminded that careless words shouldn't be spoken to their female dates, who could be spies.

Photo: David Pollack/Corbis Via Getty Images

For all the bullets and bombshells fired overseas during World War II, back home in America the battle was very much a war of words, images and ideas.

For a half-decade from roughly 1940 to 1945, the U.S. War Department and other governmental agencies fought to keep both soldiers and citizens focused on their parts in the fights in Europe and the Pacific.

For troops, that meant keeping tight lips, bathing daily, applying mosquito repellent and avoiding venereal diseases.

WORLD WAR II COMES TO LIFE: Unforgettable photos capture attack on Pearl Harbor

At home, Americans were encouraged to keep factories running, prevent food waste and above all else, keep buying war bonds.

A common form of American war propaganda from the era was poster-sized art pieces portraying images of fighting soldiers and other patriotic Americans with simple catchphrases to hammer home important messages:

- "Loose Talk Can Cost Lives"

- "The Enemy Laughs When You Loaf"

- "Keep Fit to Fight"

Much of the art from the posters is viewed as racist by today's standards, particularly in its depiction of the Japanese culture. The Japanese were often portrayed as vampiric or rat-like, with sunken faces and long fangs. They also often were drawn with squinting eyes and oversized glasses.

Celebrities of the day were often used in propaganda campaigns, particularly on TV and  on the big screen.

Here, beloved actor and singer Bing Crosby sings about the importance of buying war bonds:

Check out the images above to see how America fought the war with words during World War II.

Photos: U.S. propaganda art, posters of World War IIlove car